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Hounds

The Puppy Walker

 puppy walker

No members of your hunting community are loved by Masters and huntsman as dearly as the puppy walkers. Each year these intrepid folk accept the arrival of a couple of playful pups to their country home in early summer to teach them their names, walking on lead, a semblance of civilized behavior, and a taste of life outside the kennel.

In a couple of months, after the cuddly innocents have grown into marauding, thieving, hunting fanatics, the puppy walkers cry, “Uncle!” and the huntsman returns to reclaim them. The huntsman will be back the following summer, however, and these generous puppy walkers will smilingly welcome yet another couple of wide-eyed puppies to their property.

So, when your Masters praise the puppy walkers at the annual puppy show and bestow a small trophy upon those who walked the winning hounds, recall this poem by Will H. Ogilvie and give the puppy walkers their due!

Will You Walk a Puppy?

‘Will you walk a puppy?’ the Hunt enquired.
Being sportsmen, we did as the Hunt desired.
And early in June there arrived a man
With an innocent bundle of white and tan.
A fat little Foxhound, bred to the game,
With a rollicking eye and a league-long name,
And he played with a cork at the end of a string;
And walking a puppy was ‘just the thing.’

The Tom Smith Cast

tom smith castHounds speak confidently in covert; the whipper-in on the far side lifts his cap to the sky; and hounds burst into the open in full cry.

Suddenly all of life is in motion. Your head fills with the sights and sounds of the chase—the cry of hounds, the huntsman’s horn, the thud of hooves, the wind in your ears. Bliss. Then it all goes quiet.

The pack fractures, hounds searching for the lost line. The huntsman gives them a chance to recover it on their own. He doesn’t want the line to go cold, nor does he wants hounds to lift their heads and look to him for help every time they are at fault. Hounds make their own swing. The huntsman weighs all the factors—wind, scenting conditions, time passing, landscape, how the foxes have run here in the past. He decides to make a cast.

Canadian Grand Champion Has a Royal Family Tree

 canadian14.mary raphaelToronto and North York huntsman John Harrison gets his hounds moving for the judges. / Mary Raphael photo

Toronto and North York Clarence 2012 was judged Grand Champion of the Canadian Foxhound Show at the Ottawa Valley Hunt Farm on June 14, 2014. Judges were Messrs. C. Martin Scott, ex-MFH, Vale of the White Horse (UK) and Mason Lampton, MFH, Midland Foxhounds (GA).

It wasn’t too long ago that the Canadian hunts showed mainly English foxhounds, but the Canadian show now offers classes for both English and Crossbred Champions. With this in mind, it’s interesting to note that this year’s Grand Champion, while considered English based on the high percentage of English bloodlines in his pedigree, goes back in tail female to Midland Crossbred lines and on his sire’s side to a strong Blue Ridge female line of Crossbreds.

Clarence’s dam, Toronto and North York Clinic 2006, was a Crossbred hound out of a Midland female.* His sire, Blue Ridge Barnfield 2010, goes back in tail male to strong English lines of which Judge Martin Scott makes note:

Green Creek Bankrupt Is Grand Champion at Carolinas

carolinas14.bankrupt2.colleen wilsonTot Goodwin, MFH and huntsman of the Green Creek Hounds with Carolinas Hound Show Grand Champion Bankrupt '13  /  Don West photo

Following in his sire’s footsteps, Green Creek Bankrupt 2013 was judged Grand Champion foxhound at the Carolinas Hound Show on May 10, 2014. Bankrupt’s sire, Why Worry Braveheart 2009, garnered the same honor at the Carolinas in 2010.

Bankrupt is an English dog hound with Duke of Beaufort’s bloodlines throughout the top half of his pedigree. His dam, Green Creek Ransom 2010, was bred by the Live Oak Hounds and goes back in tail female to Mooreland bloodlines with contributions from the Mid Devon, Ledbury, North Cotswold, Heythrop, and College Valley and North Umberland.

A first year hound, Bankrupt entered well and hunts well according to Tot Goodwin, MFH and huntsman. “He’s not the fastest hound,” admits Goodwin. “He’s a middle-of-the-pack hound, but he’s always in there...hard to fault.”

Posted June 17, 2014