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Researchers in Australia have developed a new scientific method they claim could boost the success of horse breeding via artificial insemination (AI) around the world. With their discovery, semen can be stored, shipped, and used at ambient temperature. Chilling or freezing, which can damage cells, would not be necessary.

Scientists at the University of Newcastle developed a nutrient-rich liquid which, when added to horse semen collected after ejaculation, keeps the sperm alive for longer periods at ambient temperature. With the new liquid, the sperm could remain viable for up to two weeks, as opposed to only about three days when chilled.

The research came about after a grant collaboration between stakeholders in the national and international equine industry, and included a number of universities. The concern is that horse breeding has fallen behind other animal industries.

The University of Newcastle is located in New South Wales Hunter Valley, the second largest Thoroughbred breeding area in the world. While the Thoroughbred stud book does not allow the use of artificial insemination, other horse breeders are expected to benefit from the breakthrough.

Cryo-preservation, according to a researcher, can damage cells and reduced their life span once thawed, thereby reducing fertility. Click for Robert Virtue's complete article in ABC Newcastle.

Posted April 22, 2017

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