Fox Hunting Life with Horse and Hound

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He Likes Me, Dad!

Loudoun West Hound meets boy
Five-year-old Charlie Eifler shows his delight in meeting a foxhound of the Loudoun Hunt West. His dad Scott Van Pelt facilitates the introduction.  Photo by Austin Kaseman

Master of All He Surveys

fox.roundbalesI used to pass this stack of round bales every day on the school run. It's a few hundred yards as the crow flies from the Cottesmore (UK) kennels! One day I noticed this fox and was able to stop the car, get the camera out, and shoot several frames. He/She didn't bat an eyelid. When I drove past later that day it had gone.

Posted November 4, 2011

 

 

 

 

Puddle of Puppies

This photo was taken by Rebecca Harris the morning after Hurricane Irene hit Pennsylvania. The puppies had been kept awake all night by howling winds and torrential downpours that flooded one side of their kennel. With morning came the sun, a big breakfast, and, finally, blessed sleep.

The Patient Photographer's Reward

Sometimes you’re completely thrown out, but persistence has it’s reward! Jim Duggan hit the jackpot with this shot of the hunted coyote. Note the distinctive markings on the coyote’s front paws. They’ll be looking for him again! Jim tells it this way:

coyote                                                                                             Photo by Jim DugganThe Golden’s Bridge Hounds (NY) were hunting a North Salem fixture on October 4, 2011 with fourteen-and-a-half couple of their Penn-Marydel hounds. Masters Gene Colley and Ed Kelly were leading the field, and the chase lasted for over an hour in perfect hunting weather. I picked a viewing spot from where I could see 180 degrees and still be well hidden under the shadow of a tree and by a stone wall. The hunt went far afield, and then the coyote made a U-turn and started my way. He broke covert and started right at me. He stopped once to look back in the direction of the hounds. By that time my face was covered by the camera so I didn't have to make any movement to give my hiding place away. He kept coming on the line right to me until he heard the camera shutter going off at a rapid pace and just veered right-handed across my stone wall about twenty feet in front of me. Great enjoyment, to pick the right spot for a change! The hounds soon came to the scent and had a merry chase for another half hour or so. By then I guess the coyote had had enough. He put it in high gear and left the area...for now. Picking up hounds was a labor of love, as they had scattered all over the countryside trying to pick up the long gone coyote.